Accommodations for PGA Championship in Kiawah!

Accommodations for PGA Championship in KiawahAre you looking for accommodations for the PGA Championship in Kiawah Island, South Carolina? We’ve got you covered.  Did you know that Kiawah Island is only a short distance from peninsular Charleston.  In fact, with only 21 miles between Kiawah and the city of Charleston, it makes for short scenic drive.  You’ll have the opportunity to enjoy the PGA Championship, as well see all that Charleston has to offer.  If you need more information about our accommodations or availability during the PGA Championship in Kiawah, don’t hesitate to contact us or check our accommodations page directly.

Kiawah Island is known for its wildlife and natural beauty. You’ll find endless acres of marsh and thick forests of pine trees throughout the island.  It’s truly a beautiful place to see.  Here is a little information about The Ocean Course from the PGA:

Kiawah Island is a long, relatively thin island that runs east to west with The Ocean Course sitting along its southern coastline. Because of this happenstance of geography, there are no prevailing winds on the course. Dye took this into account when designing the course. In fact, he designed two courses in one one for an easterly wind and one for a westerly wind. 

He built as many as 6 tee boxes on each hole to allow flexibility in setting hole lengths with and against the wind. He set up separate landing areas and obstacles to challenge players regardless of the wind direction. He also designed large greens taking into account that a player may be hitting a long approach shot one day and a short approach shot on the next. Front-to-back distances measure between forty and fifty yards so that both highly lofted shots or lower-trajectory shots could hold the green. With or against the wind, however, every hole demands a high level of both accuracy and finesse, especially off the tees.

Playing in the shifting winds at The Ocean Course requires a tremendous amount of ingenuity, imagination and adaptation in shot making. Players need to adjust their game to the conditions around them more so than on any other course in the U.S. They also need to be capable of hitting every club in the bag. All too often, typical resort courses offer little more than a driver, 8-iron on par 4s and driver, 3-wood, wedge on par 5s. At Kiawah, the art of long-iron play is reinstituted.

In his design, Dye made a point to be fair. Everything is out in front of the player. There are very few blind shots. Players can see the hazards and targets. Landing areas are expansive with few surprises. But it is also a course where strategically attacking each hole is imperative. From the back tees, players have to work (and think) their way around the golf course. A player must pick the best approach angles. With the shifting winds, decisions have to be made on whether to play the ball up into the wind or hit a knockdown shot, loft a wedge or hit a bump-and-run. The ability to shape shots is also very important. Additionally, players need to know where they can miss the ball around the greens and know where they can’t. And, they’ll need to be able to scramble if they expect to post a good score.

 Photo:   rjones0856

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