The Low Country Boil, A Charleston Tradition…

If you have visited Charleston or the “Low Country,” you may have had the opportunity to try a “Low Country” boil.  If you haven’t heard it called by this name, perhaps you have heard it called by it’s less appealing name, Frogmore Stew.  It does not matter what you call it, it is a traditional recipe you should definitely try at some point.

Here is a little history about the traditional dish and a recipe from Coastal Magazine for you try:

Once called Frogmore Stew, this one-pot wonder was created by a National Guardsman when he needed to cook a meal for 100 soldiers. Richard Gay, who learned the recipe from his family, had everyone remembering his stew. The dish was later named Frogmore, where Richard was from, by the guards who teased him about home. The postal service eliminated the name Frogmore, which changed this popular dish to Lowcountry boil.

This seafood dish is a combination of shrimp, sausage, corn, and potatoes. Great for relaxing trips to the beach, it is also easy to create for a crowd. Lowcountry boil can be served on newspaper for easy clean up. Crab, onion, and butter are frequent additions to the pot, and having a removable drain basket only makes cooking easier. The rule of thumb here is the bigger the crowd, the bigger the pot.

Lowcountry Boil

4 pounds small red potatoes
5 quarts water
1 (3-ounce) bag of crab boil seasoning
4 tablespoons Old Bay seasoning
2 pounds kielbasa or hot smoked link sausage, cut into 1½-inch pieces
6 ears of corn, halved
4 pounds large fresh shrimp, peeled and deveined optional
Cocktail sauce

Add potatoes to large pot, then add 5 quarts water and seasonings. Cover pot and heat to a rolling boil; cook 5 minutes. Add sausage and corn, and return to a boil. Cook 10 minutes or until potatoes are tender.

Add shrimp to stockpot; cook 3 to 4 minutes or until shrimp turn pink. Drain. Serve with cocktail sauce. Serves 12.

As you can tell, when it comes to a Low Country Boil, simplicity usually wins out.  It is not a complicated concoction, but one that you will definitely enjoy if you are a seafood lover.  Remember, however, you can definitely add in additional ingredients as you see fit.  You can throw in additional forms of seafood if you desire, but we recommend trying it for the first time in it’s most traditional form.  We hope you enjoy the recipe!

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